Happy Aboriginal Day

Happy National Aboriginal Day!  Are there any events or opportunities for you to connect with Indigenous people and communities in your area today?  Any ways to actively reflect on solidarity and decolonization?  Or just to celebrate the contributions of First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples make to our shared culture.

Maybe you’re staying in today.  If so, here are some of our favourite videos from the Second Fridays series we ran at the Centre for Christian Studies a few years ago, where we invited indigenous and non-indigenous speakers to challenge and inspire us… Continue reading “Happy Aboriginal Day”

I Was A Witness

This spring Centre for Christian Studies student Lynn McGrath traveled to Israel and Palestine as part of a “Come and See” trip organized by the United Church of Canada and BC Conference.  (CCS diaconal ministry students are required to engage in a Global Perspectives experience as part of their program.)  The trip was led by retired minister Rev. Marianna Harris, and while there, participants connected with UCC partners such as Sabeel, Wi’am, Defence for Children International and Ecumenical Accompaniers.

Here are Lynn’s reflections on the experience:


Lynn and former CCS student Anne in Bethlehem

In April I joined eleven United Church people with curiosity and a sense of adventure for a tour of the Holy Land. I soon discovered I wasn’t just a tourist; I was a witness to the challenges that people of this land face in their daily lives. I had no prior perceptions of the Israeli or Palestinian people, but by the second day I discovered definite divisions between the two. Continue reading “I Was A Witness”

In the Beginning was the Logo – Continued

You may have noticed that the Centre for Christian Studies has a new logo popping up on our website and other places.  A few months ago I presented a retrospective of CCS logos past, and now that our new logo is here it seems appropriate to continue the story.  We’ve asked Del Sexsmith, chair of the Communications and Promotions Committee, to offer some thoughts on the nature of logos….


In the beginning was the Word… (John 1: 1)

We are all familiar with that text. All things start with the Word. We are marked by it.

And what does that have to do with our new logo? A little trivia first.

Logos is Greek for “word” and typos is Greek for “imprint.” Out of “logotype”, we have the abbreviation “logo”, the longer form of the word telling us that a logo is a graphic mark, emblem or symbol. We live with logos every day; they are synonymous with a corporate brand. In fact, we probably see a hundred or more logos every day without their truly registering with our conscious thoughts. Did you see the Apple logo when you turned on your laptop? The Windows logo on your desktop? Of course, you did. But you have already pushed this observation into the matrix of images that you accept as part of navigating your world.

Humans have developed the basic stuff of logos over a period of thousands of years, starting with ancient seals on cylinders. And coins were embossed with images hundreds of years before the birth of Christ. But our formal appreciation of logos didn’t officially get kick-started until the 1870’s, apparently, when the makers of Bass Ale trademarked their image of a red triangle and corporate branding was underway. Shortly thereafter, the Red Cross/Red Crescent set their logos. Proving that not all corporate entities are commercial. Among the better known brands, entities such as Coca-Cola and IBM have chosen to use their product name or acronym as the logo. But a simple symbol is the most effective tool for making an impression on the conscious and unconscious mind.

Christian ichthus

Strong logos strive to obtain instant recognition while earning the respect and understanding of the viewer. Christianity has been at this since the inception. There are those two intersecting arcs that (Greek again) we know as ichthus or the sign of the fish.

Latin Cross

That’s been about since the first century AD and now adorns cars everywhere, it seems. And then we have the most powerful images of the faith: the cross. There’s the Greek Cross with both lines equal in size, the Latin Cross with the horizontal cross shorter and higher on the vertical and the one that resonates with me, the Celtic Cross. It hangs in my study. But is it an icon or a logo?

 

Celtic Cross

It all depends on how you use it or how you view it. Strong logos move into colour as easily as they stand embossed in black or white. (Quick now: what colour is the Apple logo?).

As we undertake fresh programming and embrace new staff, it seems fitting for CCS  to introduce a new logo: a “C’, representing the Centre for Christian Studies. Here’s what the Branding Guidlelines document says about it:

Centre for Christian Studies

The “C” consists of coloured rays coming out of a central circle, graphically displaying our imagination of community centred in Christ and stretching outward into the community around us. The coloured rays also represent our own intimate communities of care giving us strength and encouragement to extend care to the margins of society and, reciprocally, receive challenge and insight from the margins to the centre. The “C”, a half circle, illustrates the openness to new ideas, dialogue and an invitation for others to enter. The half-circle graphically represents a welcoming, inclusive community. The diversity of colour represents the diversity of thought, experience and people. We are one body, but many individuals. The brown, green and blue tones reflect theological grounding in “diakonia”– the earth and sky. The yellows and oranges represent the light, imagination and hope – the sun and Son.

That’s a lot to grasp from one artistic representation. But over time, it will begin to embody all of those things to us at a glance. So, in short, the key attributes of a good logo are:

  • It’s easy for the eye to grasp (recognizable);
  • It embodies a key aspect of the corporate name (understandable);
  • It can be explained easily (explainable);
  • It can be embossed in one colour or media or enhanced with colour simply (flexible);
  • It can be used for a long period of time (durable).
Egyption ankh

And there you have it: the means to assess our logo or any logo, starting with the grand-daddy of them all:

The Egyptian ankh, or symbol of life. Of course, we don’t know for sure if that was the original logo; after all, CNN wasn’t there at the time to document it for us. Ah, CNN. Now there’s a good logo, too.

-Del Sexsmith

Cross images and trivia source: Wikipedia

The Only Point Is To Be Together

CCS student Meghan Witzel recently accompanied eleven youth from Waterloo Presbytery as a leader/chaplain on the “Two Countries One World” trip to Colombia.  Meghan shares some of her reflections:…


I have always believed in relational ministry. I think when we connect with people, whether on faith-based mutual ground or not, we discover the Holy in each other.

“In true relationships, the only point is to be together. Once there is another point, the relationship withers under the heat of expectations and obligations.”  – theologian Andrew Root.
Continue reading “The Only Point Is To Be Together”

Unsettled

Shelagh Balfour is a recent graduate from the Centre for Christian Studies’ course for Anglicans exploring the diaconate – Ministering by Word and Example.  One of the goals of the course was to help students develop their capacity for biblical and theological reflection, and to connect their reflections to pastoral and social responses.  She’s agreed to share her reflections on Leanne Simpson’s article “Liberated People, Liberated Lands” as an example of the kind of critical thinking our students are invited to engage in. Continue reading “Unsettled”

Ann Teaches Us To Stand

This month CCS program staff member Ann Naylor received approval to move from “medical leave” to “long-term disability.”  At our recent Annual General Meeting, CCS student Anita Rowland delivered this tribute to Ann…


Anita Rowland

I don’t know how many of you remember your first few minutes at CCS or your first conversation with Ann but for me, those two things took place at the same time.  Within minutes of walking through the door of CCS for the fall learning circle, Ann had greeted me.  So early in the morning no one else was around yet.  We talked about how long tea can be reused, moved on to the subject of quilting, and then, to the handwork of previous generations of women; and the self-expression which found voice through their work.  Continue reading “Ann Teaches Us To Stand”

Ellipses

Canada 150

The dominant group in any nation state often resorts to nostalgia, to mental or cultural ellipses, and to general forgetfulness in search of meanings and definitions to serve its own ideological needs of the moment.

-Quoted in Buffalo Shout, Salmon Cry, p. 75

CCS Program Staff member David Lappano reflects on Canada’s sesquicentennial… Continue reading “Ellipses”

Dream Job

CCS principal Maylanne Maybee writes…

Maylanne MaybeeAs the search gets underway for a new principal, I’ve heard from some, “Oh, I could never do that job!”     I remember when I thought the same thing. About six years ago I had lost a job, needed and wanted another one, and had pinned all my hopes on a position near Toronto, where I lived, which I was sure “had my name on it.”

Well, I was wrong.  I did not get my “dream job”.  In the mean time I had been approached by the Centre for Christian Studies Search Committee, asking me to think about applying for the Principal position or help them find suitable candidates.  “I could never do that job!” thought I, “at least not now. And not in Winnipeg!” Continue reading “Dream Job”

A Portrait of Thomasina Connell

2017 marks the 125th anniversary of the Centre for Christian Studies.  Over the course of the year we hope to feature one hundred and twenty-five images and stories about CCS’s history and identity.  To start things off, Lori Stewart reflects on a portrait of Thomasina Connell.

Thomasina Connell, head deaconess and principal of The Church of England Deaconess and Missionary Training House

The first time I saw the impressive portrait of Thomasina Connell, it was stuffed in a storage room in the lower level of the Centre for Christian Studies building at 77 Charles St. in Toronto.  At the time, I wondered who this clear-eyed deaconess was, dressed in the black uniform of an earlier day with the stiff white collar and bonnet.  All I knew was her name, discretely spelled out on a plaque, and that she was looking steadily out of that frame. Continue reading “A Portrait of Thomasina Connell”

Questioning Service

CCS grad Junghee Park died a year ago next Tuesday.  One of the things she did in her life was raise questions, graciously but provocatively. In her doctoral work at the Toronto School of Theology Junghee explored the concept of diakonia as companion and challenged the traditional association of diakonia with service.

In the spirit of thoughtful reflection, here is a reprint of a short piece by Junghee Park about the problem with service. As Junghee says at the end, What do you think? Continue reading “Questioning Service”

Sing for Justice – Micah’s Song

Thank you to David Kai, Jennifer Lidstone, Meghan Witzel, Ken DeLisle, Ted Dodd, Dianne Baker, and Tim Sale for helping us with this lovely video to help invite people to host a “Sing for Justice” event this fall.

The Centre for Christian Studies has a long tradition of living a theology of justice.  The CCS Development Working Group would like you to raise your voice, raise some spirits, raise awareness of CCS, and raise some funds to support transformative education.  For more information on how you can get involved, check out the Sing for Justice page, or contact Lori at stewart@ccsonline.ca .

Thoughts on Being Chaplain

Learning Circle chaplains Christina Paradela and Denise Davis-Taylor
Learning Circle chaplains Christina Paradela and Denise Davis-Taylor

Over the past two and a half weeks of the Social Ministry spring learning circle, two graduates of the Centre – Denise Davis Taylor (grad 1982) and Christina Paradela (grad 2000) – have been providing care and support to the students in the circle.  We asked them to reflect on their experience as chaplains at the learning circle.  They wrote …

Continue reading “Thoughts on Being Chaplain”

Happy Earth Day

pelican in flight

This morning in the Social Ministry learning circle a group of students is leading a session on the social, political, and spiritual significance of water.

And last week Maylanne was in Wisconsin offering leadership for the Conference of Anglican Religious Orders in the Americas (CAROA), helping them explore the implications of Pope Francis’ Laudato Si and the Conversion of Life for intentional religious communities, and ways that care for creation is connected to care for the poor is connected to the spiritual life.

CAROA group c

Continue reading “Happy Earth Day”