Image of the Week – Path

This week’s image: A Path.

exhausted after a day of hard climbing, disconcerted by frequent heavy fog and uncertainty about the location of the next signpost, watching, listening, one step a time, looking for a way forward.

What do you see in this image?

path

Theological Reflection: “A way where there was no way”

Lately CCS staff have been discussing drafts of various reports being developed in The United Church of Canada about the structure of the denomination, the future of theological education, and ministry designation, including the future of diaconal ministry.  It is clear that change is needed but disagreement abounds throughout the church regarding which direction will lead us to new life.  We need not dig deep to find disgruntlement about the path on which we are traveling.

Sound familiar?

The Narrative Lectionary has had us traveling with Moses and the ancient  Israelites, escaping from slavery in Egypt, knowing that turning back is not an option, uncertain about the way ahead, none too happy about the leadership.  The God that journeyed with the ancient Israelites also journeys with us.  Time after time, a way where there was no way.

Litany  (used in staff worship on October 8, 2014)

“In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth, the earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over the face of the waters… and there was evening and there was morning, the first day… and God saw that it was good.”   (Genesis 1:1-9 excerpts)

A way where there was no way

The story of the Israelites following Moses out of Egypt – the sea parts and the people find safe passage;

A way where there was no way

A group of friends ripping apart a roof to gain access to Jesus for their desperately ill friend;

A way where there was no way

The Beguines – women living in community, dedicated to a life of discipleship among the poor;

A way where there was no way

Bishop’s Messengers offering ministry in isolated areas;

A way where there was no way

Harriet Tubman and collaborators in the Underground Railroad – leading slaves to freedom;

A way where there was no way

Harriet Christie – traveling across Canada selling bricks to raise money for much-needed building for diaconal education;

A way where there was no way

Dr. Jessie Saulteaux and those who gathered around her vision – pursuing a dream, a commitment to indigenous theological education for Aboriginal ministers to serve Aboriginal communities;

A way where there was no way

Field-based/community-based/regional programming opening the door to expanded opportunities for diaconal education;

A way where there was no way

Prior Learning Assessment Review – recognition of experience and learning – a way of making theological education more accessible;

A way where there was no way

We are firmly rooted in a tradition of preparing, listening, responding, discerning, risking, trusting that we are accompanied by a God who offers vision, troubles the waters, and calls us to community, to love, to justice.

A way where there was no way

(Photo credit: Nancy Sanders, Reflection: Ann Naylor)